July 23, 2004

Nobel Prize Winning Geneticist Dr. Ed Lewis Has Died

Dr. Ed Lewis, one of the last of the old geneticists who worked with fruit flies prior to Watson and Crick's description of the DNA molecule, passed away Wednesday.

Author and longtime collaborator Howard Lipshitz, in a book published this year, described Lewis' research as "the bridge linking experimental genetics as conducted in the first half of the 20th century, and the powerful molecular genetic approaches that revolutionized the field in its last quarter."

In awarding Lewis the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine [in 1995], the Nobel committee cited him for identifying and classifying "a small number of genes that are of key importance in determining the body plan and the formation of body segments."

Lewis obviously loved his work. He retired in 1988, but kept an active schedule in his laboratory until recently when his health began to fail from cancer.

Posted by Stephen Gordon at 12:29 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

April 29, 2004

Who is This "Stephen" Guy

Stephen Gordon is an attorney who has been practicing law in Shreveport, Louisiana for seven years.

He was born in 1969 in the country of Panama to his father, a U.S. Airforce Captain, and to his mother, a Mathematics instructor. He returned with his family to the United States as a baby and attended grades K-12 in Shreveport.

Stephen was always a mediocre student in school until he was forced to take a 10th grade English correspondence course. Through that experience he learned the joy of active learning. No longer content to sit passively absorbing information in the classroom, his grades improved and he entered college hungry for success.

Stephen finished a Bachelor of Science degree in three years from East Texas Baptist University in Marshal, Texas; then he obtained an MBA degree from Milsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi; and finally he law degree from Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, Mississippi.

In 1992 he married his college sweetheart Sheralyn McFaul. Stephen and Sheralyn are the proud parents of three sons aged six, four, and < 1.

In 1991 Stephen had a brush with national infamy when he and his brothers thought they saw a small black bear perched in a tall tree near their home. Being good citizens, they called the authorities. Numerous sheriff's deputies, game wardens, and a wildlife biologist rushed to the scene to try to capture the bear. As night fell spotlights, nets, and tranquilizer darts were deployed. When the tranqed bear did not fall, desperate agents cut the tree down and discovered a heavily sedated black garbage bag. Stephen had hoped to keep the whole thing quiet. It didn't stay quiet. He looks back now and realizes this experience gave him much needed humility.

Stephen had another important formative experience when he took a college field trip to a sedentary rock outcrop near Waco, Texas. During that trip he saw and helped excavate fossils from the rock that showed progressive biological complexity. Coming to accept the theory of evolution as "the way it happened" challenged Stephen's Christian faith, but did not destroy it.

Stephen has been interested in science since early childhood. Today, he hopes to be a life-long scholar and amateur speculist throughout an extended lifespan.

Stephen's optimism about our technological future is a reflection of Arthur C. Clarke's Three Laws:

  1. "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong."

  2. "The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible."

  3. "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

Whatever the future holds, Stephen hopes to "live to see it."

Posted by Stephen Gordon at 02:55 PM | Comments (12) | TrackBack

March 22, 2004

The Word You're Looking For...

Glenn Reynolds comments on the disdain Leon Kass has for the barbaric practice of eating ice cream in public, an activity that Miss Manners Herself has no objection to.

It's been said that a Puritan is a person who lies awake in bed at night worrying that someone, somewhere, might be having a good time. Note the interesting coincidence of puritanism and luddism. Time was somebody like this would have been called a killjoy or a wet blanket. Virginia Postrel named her important book on dynamism after these characters: Enemies of the Future.

I have a title that I would like to propose for Leon Kass, his cronies, and anyone who would discourage public ice cream consumption. The word you're looking for, Professor Reynolds, is buzzkill.

Posted by Phil at 10:06 PM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

January 20, 2004

Busy Days

Due to some unforeseen circumstances, I wasn't able to do any blogging yesterday (reading or writing), so I missed the Carnival of the Capitalists. If you missed it, too, here's your second chance.

The workload and unexpected personal priorities continue today, so blogging will be light once again. In the interests of time, I'm going to skip a "This Week" summary.

Oh, all right. A quick one. This week in The Speculist:

Monday
De Nada.

Tuesday
Not much.

Wednesday
Stillness, (Maybe. I'm rewriting that chapter. It might be done on time.)

Thursday
Futurist Grab-Bag.

Friday
Potpourri of Predictions.

Saturday
Speculist Surprise.

And throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas. There. That's better. It's good to have a plan.

Posted by Phil at 06:43 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 18, 2004

The Big Day

Friday was our biggest day ever at The Speculist. I want offer up 5,352 heartfelt thank-you's to Glenn Reynolds for pointing a few new folks my way, and 7,474 of the same to all of you for racking up so many page views.

Here are the totals:

Since it was such a hit, I'm thinking of following up Death Sucks with some equally controversial essays. How about Poop Stinks? Kittens Are Cute? Pie Is Yummy?

Posted by Phil at 06:20 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 05, 2004

This Week 01/05/04

Today is my first day back at work, plus I'm in a state of quasi-mourning about this whole situation. Still, I expect that what with NASA showing us some exciting images of Mars, along with other developments, there should be plenty to speculate about.

Our 7 Questions and Speaking of the Future interview with Charles Murtaugh will probably not run before next week. So stay tuned on that one.

And, yes, Chapter 21 of Stillness will show up right on schedule on Wednesday.

Posted by Phil at 09:24 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

December 23, 2003

Light Blogging

I have the flu.

And today is my last official work day of the year.

And while I may not be going out and lining up any Hooter's Girls, I do still have some shopping to do.

So don't be surprised if not a creature is stirring around here for a while (not even a Lazarus mouse) unless "El Jef" decides to post some more LoTR wisdom—or anything else he'd like to do; go nuts, man—or I just start to feeling better and give up on (I mean finish with) my other priorities.

Posted by Phil at 08:45 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

December 22, 2003

This Week 12/22/03

As Scrooge said to the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, "Spirit, are these the shadows of things that will be, or things that may be?"

With that important question in mind, here are some things that might happen this week in The Speculist:

Monday
Charlie Brown and Linus will set off across town in search of a Christmas tree to use for their play. When the results are deemed unsatisfactory by the rest of the gang, Charlie Brown will stalk off with the tree in tow muttering, "Well, next time get your own damn tree, beeyotch."

Tuesday
Um, if you haven't lined up your Drummers Drumming, Pipers Piping, and (especially) Lords-a-Leaping by now, you're probably not going to make it. You might drop by your local Hooters and persuade some of the waitresses to fill in as Ladies Dancing and/or Maids-a-Milking, but you didn't get the idea from me. Hint: the five gold rings is all she's really interested in, anyway.

Wednesday
A big day. A lot can happen.

Uncle Billy will accidentally hand Old Man Potter the $8,000 he was about to deposit wrapped up in a newspaper and immediately realize his mistake. The resulting brawl between a stupid old drunk guy and wheelchair-bound-Barrymore will be a truly ugly site, and will end up on a Fox show where they take clips from security cameras and put funny music behind them.

The attorney for a patient at new York's Bellevue Hospital will introduce sack loads of mail as evidence that his client is not insane. (A later ploy to slip the judge a $1 bill to somehow prove the same thing will be rejected as stupid and illogical.) In making his ruling, the judge will tell about how the US Postal service has screwed up his Christmas cards the last four years in a row, and can't be considered an authority on anything but making grown men wear dorky looking shorts. It will be back to the padded cell for Kris.

Our intrepid adventurers will make their way back to the North Pole from the Island of Misfit Toys only to find that, under the right conditions, a luminescent nose isn't that much help. With his sleigh newly outfitted with halogens, Santa will head off into the night still chuckling about "that red-nosed freak."

Also, we'll have a new chapter of Stillness.

Thursday
Good bless us, every one.

Friday
In honor of Boxing Day, we'll spend some time discussing just what the heck Boxing Day is.

Saturday
As of this day, we can all be sufficiently sick of eating Christmas-related food. If there's any more of that Figgy pudding left...let it go, man. Just let it go.

Also, there may be some actual blogging, including an interview with AI George Bush.

Posted by Phil at 09:47 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

December 11, 2003

If I had $20...

...for everybody who's ever read The Speculist, I'd be a millionaire! We passed 50,000 unique visitors yesterday on the heels of the Professor's generous linkage. (That's the Law Professor, not the Rocket Science Professor. But Chris has been no slouch in providing links, don't get me wrong.) It occured to me that I haven't published a traffic summary for October or November, so we'll let this report suffice. You'll notice that things slowed down a little in November, but they appear to be picking back up again.

I (almost) wish we hadn't got that Instalanche. Some recent pieces have been widely linked to, especially the John Smart interview. I would have liked to see us match the traffic levels of earlier months (where we got a couple or three 'lanches) with no help from Uncle Glenn. I just don't want it so bad that I would ever ask him not to link! *

Anyhow, if you're reading this, thanks for being one of more than 50,000!

* Or, more accurately, refrain from begging him to link.

Posted by Phil at 05:06 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

December 10, 2003

Carnival of the Bugs

Chris at Signal + Noise presents Carnival of the Vanities #64. Check out the beautifully illustrated insect theme.

Nice work, Chris!

Posted by Phil at 06:57 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

December 05, 2003

Light Blogging

My work/travel schedule isn't allowing me to do much Speculating this week. And I won't be back in town in time for this. (Sarge, you ought to try to make it if you can.)

However, if you scroll down a little, you'll find that there is plenty to read. Riding the Spiral has as much content as an average week of blogging around here, if not more.

Enjoy!

Posted by Phil at 02:55 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

December 03, 2003

A Golden Opportunity

Every Wednesday, I publish a new chapter of Stillness, which has been hailed as "the finest novel of its kind ever to appear in a blog named The Speculist." If you've missed the first 15 chapters, fear not. They are listed in a handy hyperlinked Table of Contents, below.

You know, a fun way to approach it might be to start at Chapter 1 and read through Chapter 16.

Just a thought.

Oops, sorry. That Table of Contents has moved.

Posted by Phil at 08:40 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Carnival of the Vanities #63

...is up, over at Begging to Differ. Check it out!

Posted by Phil at 05:54 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

About Those Seven Questions

Seven Questions About the Future with John Smart will be published tomorrow along with our Speaking of the Future interview with him.

I know. I can't wait, either!

Posted by Phil at 05:52 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

December 02, 2003

It Takes a Little Effort

In the ongoing contest to provide the most self-referentially paradoxical comment ever, I'm pleased to announce that Emmanuel has taken a strong lead. (Scroll all the way down to see it.)

Meanwhile, Prof. Hall remains the maestro of consistent self-referentiality.

Posted by Phil at 11:46 AM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

December 01, 2003

This Week 12/01/03

This week is going to be huge.

Foremost, John Smart, Director of the Institute for Accelerating Change, will be our special guest, answering the Seven Questions and participating in a fascinating interview for this week's Speaking of the Future. Hold on to your hats, people.

We've already had the big news today about developments in the Great Assembler Debate.

Plus, In the Future... turns 100 this week. Let's look at the whole week as it will unfold:

Monday
The Assembler debate heats up. Plus, holiday book-shopping ideas for the transhumanist on your Christmas list.

Tuesday
John Smart answers Seven Questions About the Future.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 16. Emmett gets a little help in pondering his choice.

Thursday
Speaking of the Future with John Smart.

Friday
Speculist University. We have some catching up today after the holiday break.

Saturday
Future Round-up. A review of the first 100 In the Future... predictions.

And throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 02:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

November 20, 2003

Keeping Count

ITF #94 was the 400th Speculist entry. At this rate, we'll be at 500 by the end of the year. And we'll have our 100th ITF by sometime next week.

Come on, now, fellas. Who's going to write that coveted century-mark "In the Future..."?

Posted by Phil at 12:11 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

November 18, 2003

Yeah, but "Live to See It" is Pretty Good, Too

I just discovered a wonderful blog, Cyborg Democracy, which I'm adding to the blogroll as soon as .com comes back up. Check out this self-descriptive tag line:

A collaborative blog for democratic transhumanists, nanosocialists, revolutionary singularitarians, non-anthropocentric personhood theorists, radical futurists, leftist extropians, bioutopians and biopunks, socialist-feminist cyborgs, transgenders, body modifiers, basic income advocates, world federalists, agents of the Culture and the Cassini Division, Viridians and technoGaians - transmitting a sexy, high-tech vision of a radically democratic future

Very nice, but what about Practical Time Travelers? Serious Optimists? Speculists? I do my best to be as high-tech, radically democratic, and sexy as the next guy.

While there, be sure to check out the highly confused ramblings of one Charlie Stross, a transhumanist science fiction writer. I can only assume that Americans writing about British politics come off as laughably wrong-headed as guys like this do when writing about the US. American media is apparently controlled by a cabal of the "extreme right" (a vast conspiracy thereof, no doubt) who are opposed to the notion of human equality. The piece actually deserves a full-blown fisking, but I don't feel right about doing that in the same entry where I'm recommending the blog. (Which I heartily do.)

Okay, just a little. Here's a giveaway quote:

Now, if you plug these views into the picture you can see that I must be some kind of communist. Because I don't hold with the idea that the guys at the top of the pile are special in some mystical, magical, divine-right-of-kings manner, or that markets are holy and perfect and will enrich everybody in every way. Right?

Just about as wrong as you can be, Chuckles old sock. Those beliefs are, in fact, held by extremists—white supremacists and social Darwinists on the one hand, Objectivists and big-L Libertarians on the other—and have nothing whatever to do with the mainstream of American politics. The most liberal Democrats and the most conservative Republicans take the same stance as you do on those issues. You have to go to the wacky fringe (far from the corridors of power, leftist fantasies about a right-wing cabal notwithstanding) to find anyone who would call you a "communist" for holding those beliefs.

Anyway, don't let your reading of Cyborg Democracy end there. The entries on Max More's view that democracy is a more or less optional thing here in the pre-posthuman era are fascinating and right on the money. Keep scrolling so you don't miss any!

Posted by Phil at 09:47 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

November 17, 2003

This Week 11/17/03

It's great to be back. No, seriously, I was really getting tired of lying around on the beach.

Not. Anyway, here's what's in store this week...

Monday
Imagining the future is only the first step in achieving it. And it's also sometimes the third step, the seventh step, the 11th step, the 287th step...

Tuesday
I've got nothing. I'm going to check in with Sarge on those literary answers to the Seven Questions about the Future. (Ah, now the crushing weight of the new office begins to sink in on him.)

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 14. Emmett finds out a little more about the QC protocols.

Friday
Speculist University. Better hit those books, people.The substitute teacher is gone. The old man is back.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future predictions for this week.

And throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 12:55 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Sarge at Large

(Okay, I promise to stop doing that with titles.)

Many thanks to the Sarge for covering for me last week. I like what you've done with the place, Mike, especially the nifty new logo for Spec. U.

(Drumroll, please.)

Mike Sargent is hereby promoted to the rank of Jefe Grande in the FastForward Posse. (Ringleaders please take note.) His posting privileges are extended indefinitely.

Posted by Phil at 12:42 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

November 10, 2003

This Week 11/10/03

Since Phil is too far away to mind the store, this will be an unstructured week at the Speculist.

Monday
We doodle in the margins of the Time Traveler's Notebook with a first-ever sidebar. We'll look at a few tools available to the practical time traveller.

Tuesday
We'll look for some literary answers to the Seven Questions about the Future.

Wednesday
We unwrap Stillness, Chapter 13.

Thursday
Speaking of the Future takes a break. But tune in, I might just have a surprise waiting...

Friday
Speculist University.
I'll introduce another facet of our alma mater and we'll take the Potluck 101 quiz.

Saturday
We'll have the usual Future Round-up. All of the In the Future predictions for this week.

And throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Michael S. Sargent at 06:45 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

November 08, 2003

Sarge is in Charge

I'm going to be on vacation next week, taking a hiatus from both work and blogging. I'll be returning on Monday, November 17. In my absence, futurist, Posse Ringleader, and all-around good guy Mike Sargent has graciously agreed to step in and run things for me. You all know Mike from his many contributions to In the Future... and FastForward. So please, class, be nice to the substitute teacher.

Take it away, Sarge. Have a great week!

Posted by Phil at 07:18 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

November 03, 2003

This Week 11/03/03

Our special guest this week is Rand Simberg: aerospace engineer, columnist, consultant, space blogger extraordinaire. Rand's name was bandied about recently when some of the Posse members were talking about who should be our next (actually, our first) US Supreme Astro-Commander. This promises to be a fun week!

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook. We'll look at the four phases of the time travel process.

Tuesday
Rand Simberg answers Seven Questions about the Future.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 12. Part II begins. We meet a guy named Emmett who apparently works for the same company as Reuben, but who leads a much less glamorous life. If you've been meaning to read Stillness (and I assume that applies to everyone who currently is not reading it), this will be a great time to start. Part II introduces a brand new story with no immediate connection to the previous 11 chapters (which you can always go back and catch up on later.) Part II is very different from Part I. Check it out.

Thursday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Rand Simberg.

Friday
U. Spec. What is Speculist University? What degrees are offered? Who can attend? Answers to these and other questions.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 07:53 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 28, 2003

Fire Update

Posse member Joanie (that's Ms. Goddess to the likes of guys like me) has the latest on the impact of the fires in San Diego. She offers some sound advice to the evacuation-averse:

Anyone who is told to evacuate, but hasn't, should keep this in mind: by remaining in your home after you've been ordered to leave, you are risking your life and that of the rescue crew. Please, think about that. Maybe you don't have much regard for yourself, but there are many of us who have loved ones out there trying to save your sorry hides. Get out when you're told! "I'm not going to be comfortable over at so-and-so's house." Well, guess what? You'll be even more uncomfortable on fire. And, putting others in harm's way because you're feeling stubborn just doesn't cut it in my book.

So true. All the best to you and everyone there, Joanie. Keep us posted.

Posted by Phil at 10:47 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Just in Time for a Halloween Broadcast

They say it's a binary asteroid, which is interesting enough in its own right. But look at that picture and then compare it to this.

I'm spooked, folks. Pretty darn spooked.

Posted by Phil at 10:36 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

This Week 10/28/03

This will be an unstructured week here at The Speculist. We're taking a breather from all regular features except for In The Future...

Next week, we'll be back with a new interview, an entry from the time traveler's notebook, and the beginning of a new storyline in Stillness. Until then, just sit back and enjoy the stream of consciousness.

Posted by Phil at 04:16 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 24, 2003

In Your Dreams, Professor Hall

No offense, Chris. I don't mean to question the prowess of one of my own posse members, but come on.

Anyhow, if it somehow is true, I hope you used one of these new ankle deals.

And by the way, stop trying to confuse people with your circular references to rumors that may or may not be denied here.

Posted by Phil at 10:58 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 17, 2003

The Weasel Watcher is Watching Us

And, contrary to how that might sound, it's a good thing.

Watcher of Weasels has organized a Watcher's Council that puts together a weekly collection of links to selected posts. The members of the council vote on their own posts as well as posts of others that they choose to nominate. Think of it as Survivor meets The Carnival of the Vanities. Check it out. It's pretty cool.

Anyhoo, my recent ramblings on Stephenson, Eco, and whether we're living in a turbo version of the middle ages was nominated and made the cut. I recieved a 1/3 vote! Read that carefully. I don't want to mislead anyone. I didn't get 1/3 of the votes cast, I received 1/3 of one vote. (At least I think I'm reading that right. My understanding of election math is demonstrably weak.)

But, hey, that was good enough for me to be included. I'm honored. Seeing as I have no way of identifying the 1/3 of one member who voted for me, I'm adding the entire Council to my blogroll.

Posted by Phil at 08:32 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Scully's Honor

As a devoted Gillian Anderson fan, I can only bow in gratitude to the good work this man is doing.

Posted by Phil at 07:04 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 14, 2003

Blog Trek

Chris Hall wants to be Worf?

And notice how nobody wants to be Wesley Crusher!

Posted by Phil at 05:31 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

An Open Letter (er, Prayer) to Da Goddess

Divine One

In utmost humility do I enter thy holy presence, beseeching that thou wouldst now — as thou hast countless times before — look down upon me with favor and, in thy great and incomprehensible mercy, smile radiantly upon me and grant me out of thy goodness a boon that will show forth to all that I am highly favored among thy servants. Grant, then, my prayer, oh Queen of Heaven, oh transcendent Mother/Harlot/Warrior/Sage. Speak then unto mortal ears Divine Wisdom, I pray thee, and answer these my Seven Questions.

In pathetic gratitude do I beseech thee.

Amen.

 

[ For those who may be wondering, I don't address all the FastForward Posse members in these terms — only the ones who rose spontaneously from the foam of the sea. ]


UPDATE: Da Goddess replies!

Posted by Phil at 01:48 PM | Comments (4) | TrackBack

October 13, 2003

This Week 10/13/03

Our special guest this week is cartoonist and filmmaker Nina Paley. Later this week, we'll be talking to her about overpopulation, animation techniques, and the nature of reality.

You know — the usual stuff.

This week in The Speculist:

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook, we'll look at completed voyages through time and what we can learn from them.

Tuesday
Nina Paley answers Seven Questions about the Future, providing what is probably the best answer yet to the flying car question.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 10. Can I interest anyone in a mysterious ancient manuscript and the hidden society that protects it? How about learning Sergei's tragic secret?

Thursday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Nina Paley.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for this week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 06:44 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 10, 2003

Our Top Futurist

I just paid a visit to the Foresight Exchange site to see how the predictions I've invested in are doing, and I noticed that FastForward Posse member Karl Hallowell is ranked as the number two player!

Now that's a futurist, folks.

Too bad it isn't real money; Karl could buy us all a round of drinks to celebrate...in Hawaii. Of course, he's too modest to make a big deal about it himself. Karl doesn't even acknowledge it when people engage in public self-flagellation in order to appease him.

Posted by Phil at 09:00 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 08, 2003

Election Math

While I don't normally do politics on this site, I don't mind the occasional foray into simple arithmetic. I've now read in a couple of places how amazing it is that Schwarzenegger and McClintock took a "majority" in yesterday's recall election. That's a delusional reading of the numbers.

Let's go through it real quick. The recall won with 54.2% of the vote. Of that 54.2% (not of the total votes cast) Arnold won 47.6. So that's 47.6% of 54.2%, or about 25.8% of the votes cast. McClintock won 13.2% of 54.2%, which comes out to about 7.2% of the votes cast. So, all told, the Republicans took a respectable 33% of the total votes cast, compared to 45.8% of the votes cast against the recall, effectively in favor of Gray Davis.

I don't think things have changed as much as the Pundits want to make out. There was no Republican majority, and more people voted for Davis than voted for both Republicans combined. If you combine the Davis and Bustamante votes, you get 45.8% plus 32.7% of 54.2% (about 17.72% of the toal votes cast) which comes out to 63.52%. The majority of voters voted for a Democrat.

None of this is to take anything away from Arnold's victory. But let's not have any nonsense about a Republican majority in California. The numbers don't support it.

UPDATE: I'm an idiot. (Yes, that is too an update. It's a Major News Flash, in fact.) I had this silly idea that if you voted no on the recall, you didn't get to pick a recall candidate. Reader JimO the Bunkbuster has graciously set me straight. See comments, below.

So everything I said about being delusional, etc. — well, they're rubber. I'm glue. All right?

Posted by Phil at 06:34 AM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

October 06, 2003

This Week 10/06/03

This week in The Speculist.

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook. Give yourself a present and read it. This entry includes a slightly exaggerated goal. See if you can figure out what it is.

Tuesday
Seven Questions About the Future with still another ringleader from the FastForward Posse.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 9. Reuben continues to recuperate, and we meet the mysterious Father Alexy.

Thursday
Speaking of the future, I don't know what I'm going to do on Thursday.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, robotics, and other future-impacting areas. So be sure to stop by often.

Posted by Phil at 06:54 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 04, 2003

I Wonder if Bart Simpson Ever Did This One?

I like to think I'm the kind of guy who can admit it when he makes a mistake. So, Karl, I hope you're reading this.

  1. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  2. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  3. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  4. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  5. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  6. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  7. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  8. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  9. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  10. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  11. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  12. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  13. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  14. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  15. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  16. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  17. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  18. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  19. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  20. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  21. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  22. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  23. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  24. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  25. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  26. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  27. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  28. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  29. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  30. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  31. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  32. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  33. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  34. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  35. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  36. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  37. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  38. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  39. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  40. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  41. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  42. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  43. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  44. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  45. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  46. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  47. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  48. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  49. I will not call a protozoa a virus.
  50. I will not call a protozoa a virus.

There. I feel better. Can I go home now?

Posted by Phil at 08:15 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 01, 2003

Summary for September

I don't know why I even keep that Site Meter link on my sidebar. If the statisitics provided by my hosting service are accurate, SiteMeter is way, way off base.

I mean, look at this:

I was hoping we would have 12,000 unique visitors in September and we had almost 13,500. We should have our 25,000th unique visitor sometime over the next few days. But according to SiteMeter, we've had fewer than 8,000 visits.

According to official SiteMeter rankings, The Speculist is ranked in the mid-400's out of a list of more than 1300 blogs. That's not bad. I'm in the upper third or at least comfortably in the upper half. Now, if SiteMeter is accurate for everybody else and only wrong for me (granted, that's unlikely) my daily average for September of 652 means I should be ranked somewhere right around 100, which would be pretty sweet. Does anybody have any idea what the deal is with SiteMeter? Do you have to have one of those paid accounts in order to get accurate stats?

Anyway, thanks to all of you who paid us a visit in September, and please come back often.

Posted by Phil at 10:46 AM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Strange Coincidence...

... or spooky harmonic convergence? We just published ITF #54, and now Dodgeblogium is hosting the Carnival of the Vanities #54.

Car 54, where are you?

Where indeed?

Posted by Phil at 06:09 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

September 29, 2003

This Week 09/29/03

This week in The Speculist.

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook. Check out the very, very, very good news.

Tuesday
Seven Questions About the Future with yet another ringleader from the FastForward Posse.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 8. Reuben gets back on his feet, starts taking a look around his new surroundings, and makes a surprising discovery.

Thursday
Some follow-up thoughts to last week's Speaking of the Future.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, robotics, and other future-impacting areas. So be sure and stop by often.

Posted by Phil at 05:17 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 24, 2003

Carnival of the Vanities #53

More proof that the FastForward Posse is taking over. This week's Carnival of the Vanities is hosted by posse member Andrew on his excellent blog, Pathetic Earthlings.

Posted by Phil at 07:36 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 22, 2003

This Week 09/22/03

This week our regular features return. Thanks to those of you who noticed them missing last week! This is home week for the Speculist, the Posse Ringleaders and I will be taking the place of our special guest.

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook. We're going to draw a map of i Space. You know how on a map Italy is kind of shaped like a boot? Well, you'll never guess what reality is shaped like.

Tuesday
One or more of our FastForward Posse ringleaders will take a stab at the Seven Questions about the Future. Others may follow throughout the week.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 7. Reuben begins to piece together what happened to him.

Thursday
FastForward Posse leaders will be Speaking of the Future with Yours Truly.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, robotics, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 03:59 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 18, 2003

Back Next Week

For those of you looking for this week's installment of Stillness, or any other regular features, I apologize. Due to a heavy workload, I haven't maintained the regular format this week.

Through Saturday, I'll probably just carry on with sporadic entries and any ITF's that strike my fancy. We'll be back next week with all the regular features.

Posted by Phil at 02:43 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 10, 2003

Carnival is Up

SolPort has this week's Carnival of the Vanities. Check it out!

Posted by Phil at 09:24 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

September 08, 2003

This Week 09/08/03

This week I've made a few subtle (and not-so-subtle) changes to the way things are organized around here. There may be a huge cash prize to whoever correctly identifies all the changes.

Monday
Time Traveler's Notebook. A question for all practical time travelers taking their first baby steps into i Space: is the prediction about a huge cash prize in the preceding paragraph a might or a won't?

Tuesday
Michael Anissimov (you may need to scroll a little) of the Immortaility Institute will answer Seven Questions about the Future.

Wednesday
Stillness, Chapter 6. Reuben awakens and makes several startling discoveries.

Thursday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Michael Anissimov.

Friday
The FastForward Posse chimes in with news and views on the coming age of thinking machines. If you're interested in participating, read this.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, robotics, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 09:41 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 02, 2003

Summary for August

The information that comes up when you click the little Site Meter button at the bottom of the directory bar (the pink thing to the right) is apparently not accurate. My hosting package comes with a utility called Awstats, which shows the following summary for our first official month of operation:

We had over 9,000 unique visitors (Site Meter reports that we've had only about 5,000 visits) our first month. That strikes me as a very strong beginning for a special-interest weblog such as this one. Thanks to all of you who paid us a visit in August, and please come back often.

Posted by Phil at 07:14 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 01, 2003

This Week 09/01/03

This week we'll be talking to our friends from the cyber world, and by that I don't mean programmers. It's time to let the programs themselves have their say.

Because of the holiday, I'm giving the Posse the week off. We'll pick up with a new FastForward next week. Maybe in light of this week's topic, we'll give the Posse a Turing Test. I wonder how they would do?

Monday
Happy Labor Day, everybody.

Tuesday
Time Traveler's Toolkit picks up with some further consideration of the different types of future.

Wednesday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Ramona, the brainchild and A.I. alter-ego of Ray Kurzweil. Ramona has some interesting things to say about how the world looks from her side of the CRT. She has some thoughts on her own future, as well.

Thursday
Stillness, Chapter 5. Ksenia, Reuben, Pasha: somebody's not getting out of this chapter alive. And the other two will be deeply wounded. I've already said way too much.

Friday
Various A.I. chatbots will answer Seven Questions About the Future. Have you ever tried to get a chatbot to answer a specific question? Well, try seven.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for the week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, robotics, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 11:54 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 31, 2003

These Things Happen in Threes

First it was Ray Bradbury. Then the Professor.

Now yours truly. Blogging will be light today and tomorrow (which is Labor Day anyhow, plus I'm going to be suffering from a major cake hangover.)

Posted by Phil at 07:17 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 25, 2003

This Week 08/25/03

On Wednesday, Earth and Mars will be closer to each other than they've been for nearly 60,000 years. To mark this momentous occasion, all this week we'll be slanting everything we do in a Marsward (or at least a spaceward) direction

Let the Madness begin.

This week:

Monday
Time Traveler's Toolkit. So far we have explained what a Speculist is, defined Practical Time Travel, and had a glimpse at how the future looks from different points of view. This week, we're going to classify nine — no, make that twelve — distinct kinds of future and talk about the role we have to play in each.

Tuesday
A rapidly growing FastForward Posse provides the ulitmate guide to all things Martian.

Wednesday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Dr. Robert Zubrin, President of the Mars Society and author of The Case for Mars. Dr. Zubrin will explain why we shouldn't just focus on how close Mars is to us, the real question is how close are we to Mars? He has some ideas for getting us a whole lot closer.

Thursday
Stillness, Chapter 4. Reuben's date with Ksenia takes the promised ugly turn. We say goodbye to all that kissy-lovey stuff as we plunge into heart-pounding suspense.

Friday
Robert Zubrin will answer Seven Questions About the Future.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for this week brought together in one handy list. We're still not caught up from doing only four a couple of weeks ago, so we'll see how it unfolds.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in Mars, nanotechnology, Mars, artificial intelligence, space exploration (especially like to, say, Mars), robotics, Mars, and other future-impacting areas. Such as Mars.

Posted by Phil at 06:46 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 20, 2003

Carnival #48 Kicks Off

...over at Outside the Beltway. Don't miss it!

Posted by Phil at 09:11 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

August 18, 2003

This Week 08/18/03

Had a blast at the Rocky Mountain Blogger Bash on Saturday. It was great seeing the faces behind Liquid Courage, TalkLeft, RessurectionSong, RoverPundit, The Blog of the Century of the Week, Walter in Denver, Conclusive Evidence: of Dave Cullen Having Existed, The Worldwide Rant, Protein Wisdom (if this guy is a Rocky Mountain blogger, how come his Coming Soon notice is all about Cincinatti? am I too literal-minded or what?), and others, I know I'm leaving a few out — sorry! A couple of FastForward Posse members also put in a guest appearance to kind of round out the evening. It was great!

Speaking of the Posse, we'll be introducing some new members this week so watch TTT and FastForward. Plus we're still looking for new Posse members, and joining up has never been easier.

This week:

Monday
Time Traveler's Toolkit. Having explained what a Speculist is and having defined Practical Time Travel, we spend some time talking about who the future belongs to, and what the future looks like (and what we can do with it) from various points of view.

Tuesday
The FastForward Posse takes a look at jacking in, wearing computers, and basically living in logged-on-all-the-time world. Some good stuff!

Wednesday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Christine Peterson, President and co-founder (along with Eric Drexler) of the Foresight Institute. Christine will weigh in on the Great Assembler Debate, misconceptions about nanotechnology, and provide an answer to the question that's been eating away at many of us: will we all soon have tiny robots in our pants?

Thursday
Stillness, Chapter 3. Reuben and Ksenia go on a date. There may be some kissing. Okay, there definitely will be some kissing. But if you don't like that sort of thing, don't worry, it's only right at the end. (Maybe I'm giving too much away?) There's also some hand-holding earlier than that. But if hand-holding bothers you, maybe you're not quite ready for grown-up stories, hmm? Or maybe hand-holding bothers you because you don't like all this sissified lovey-kissy stuff. If that's your problem, all I can tell you is...hang on. Next week, in Chapter 4, things are going to take a really ugly turn. (Okay, now I'm definitely giving too much away.)

Friday
Christine Peterson will answer Seven Questions About the Future.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for this week brought together in one handy list. I'll probably do six this week, since I only did four last week and I want to get the average back up to five per week.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 07:57 AM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

August 14, 2003

You Can Call Me Ben

Obi-Wan Kenobi

With the prowess of a seasoned samurai and the wisdom of a wizard, you try to do the sort of things that root out evil.

The Force can have a strong influence on the weak-minded.

Which Fantasy/SciFi Character Are You?

Posted by Phil at 12:10 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 13, 2003

Advantage, Speculist

Once again, Old Media scrambles to catch up with the blogosphere. Check out this New York Times op-ed on life extension, opening with a quote from our very own Aubrey de Grey.

So there's your choice, folks. You can find out what's going on in the world right now in the Speculist, or you can wait a week and read about it in the New York Times.


UPDATE: Aubrey clarifies his position and provides a detailed timeline for curing aging.

Posted by Phil at 11:41 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 12, 2003

This Week 08/12/03

That worm that you've been reading about elsewhere has Comcast (my Internet provider) down all over the country. That's why this summary is going up today instead of yesterday when it should have. Anyhow, worm permitting, this week in the Speculist:

Monday
Time Traveler's Toolkit. We define Practical Time Travel.

Tuesday
The FastForward Posse takes a look at jacking in, wearing computers, and basically living in logged-on-all-the-time world.

Wednesday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Alex Lightman, CEO and co-founder of Charmed Technologies, a spin-off from MIT's Media Lab which is positioning itself as a leader in the emerging market for wearable Internet Technology.

Thursday
Stillness, Chapter 2.

Friday
Alex Lightman will answer Seven Questions About the Future.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for this week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week we'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.

Posted by Phil at 10:26 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 04, 2003

Blast-Off!

If I had a FAQ, one of the questions would surely be, "How can you 'launch' something that you've been doing for a month?" This is one of the reasons I don't yet have a FAQ. Another, perhaps more compelling, reason is that I'm just launching today, so I haven't really had any questions. Much less any frequently asked questions.

I hope that clears everything up.

This week in the Speculist:

Monday
The first official installment of Time Traveler's Toolkit. TTT — how I wanted to call it T3; damn James Cameron and his superfluous sequels — is a guide to do-it-yourself futurism, introducing ideas, tool sets and modes of thinking that can help us make the best possible use of the future. Today we back up a little and look at what I mean by the word Speculist.

Tuesday
The first-ever installment of FastForward. With the help of my FastFoward Posse, I'll be providing ideas for reaping the benefits of the future right now. This week, in line with our special guest, we'll take a look at life extension, posse-style.

Wednesday
We'll be Speaking of the Future with Aubrey de Grey, a Cambridge professor who is working to develop a cure for human aging. How long do you expect to live? Aubrey will give you some reasons to re-think your answer.

Thursday
The premiere of Stillness.

Friday
Aubrey de Grey will answer Seven Questions About the Future.

Saturday
Future Round-up. All of the In the Future... predictions for this week brought together in one handy list.

Plus, throughout the week I'll be blogging developments in nanotechnology, aritifical intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas. It's great having you along. Welcome!

One more thing. The blogosphere is full of incredibly creative, wonderful, generous people. I'd like to thank the following bloggers for their help and/or encouragement going into this week: Scott Forbes, Bill Quick, Dan, Josh Wolfe, Howard Lovy, Joe Dougherty, Joanie, John Rosenberg, Natalie Solent, Rand Simberg, Laurence Simon, Jeff Medcalf, Paul Hsieh, Henry, Adam Harris, Vincent Ferrari, and Glenn Reynolds. I hope I didn't miss anyone. But if I did, thank you, too! Special thanks to Posse Ringleaders Vick, Mike, and Suraya. And above all, thank you Dean Esmay for setting this thing up in the first place.

Posted by Phil at 06:46 AM | Comments (5) | TrackBack

Who is this Phil Guy?

Phil Bowermaster has been a full-time amateur speculist since about age three. Often misunderstood during his childhood and adolescence, he fought a frequent perception that he was "daydreaming" or "goofing off" when in fact he was involved in serious contemplation of alternative scenarios to the world he saw around him. This misunderstanding persists to the present day.

As college degree programs in speculism were not available in the recent past, Phil studied English as an undergraduate and took a master's degree in technical communication from the University of Colorado.

For more than 15 years, he has worked in the fields of IT and Telecommunications. His first big break came when he accepted the position of reviews editor for MacGuide, a now-long-defunct magazine devoted to the Apple Macintosh computer. After MacGuide, he was hired by Denver-based Quark, Inc., developing end-user documentation and training materials for their QuarkXPress desktop publishing software. Phil was pleased recently to note that, some 12 years after his departure, the Tutorial Guide that Quark was shipping with the current release of the software was still much the same manual he wrote.

After Quark, Phil joined U S WEST (now QWEST), where it took him about two years to parlay his Technical Editor position into the role of Global Business Process Development Specialist. (Note: this was never actually his job title.) As an international man of process, Phil worked on the roll-out of a number of digital mobile joint-venture companies in Russia. He had the chance to work in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Nizhni Novgorod, and Rostov. Plus he spent some time in London and Budapest.

He eventually landed in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where he spent four years heading up the Process Management/Business Improvement group for a company called Maxis. Originally a joint venture of U S WEST and local Malaysian partners, Maxis was the most ambitious start-up in the history of telecommunications: a single company that would (from its inception) incorporate digital mobile service, fixed wireline service, digital cable television, internet access, international gateway, and satellite communications — including the launch of MeaSat, Malaysia's first sattelite.

At Maxis, Phil was introduced to a beautiful and brilliant corporate lawyer named Suraya. The two worked briefly together on a project, and both were glad to see it come to an end. She considered him a typical loud American with a sophomoric sense of humor. He found her to be intractable and difficult to work with.

They were married in November, 2000.

Phil returned to Denver in early 1999 and remained with U S WEST Information Technologies until shortly before the QWEST merger. He's spent the past three years at Sybase, doing product management and business development for the telecommunications vertical group.

He lives in Colorado with his wife and a Shih Tzu named Rygel. Suraya is a senior manager in the legal department of a major Telecom. Phil's daughter— who lives with them part-time — is a teenage writer/ artist/actress/musician quadruple threat who shows strong speculist tendencies in her own right.

Today, Phil continues the work he began at an early age: re-imagining the world he sees around him, devising scenarios of what might have been and what might yet be, and developing tools for making the most of the future. The Speculist gives him the chance to share this work with others.

If you have comments on this site, or interesting speculations of your own, Phil would love to hear from you.

Posted by Phil at 05:32 AM | Comments (4) | TrackBack

August 02, 2003

Two More Days

I think that does it for me this weekend, and really for the entire pre-launch phase of the Speculist. See you all on Monday, when this thing starts for reals.

Posted by Phil at 08:53 AM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 31, 2003

Welcome Daily Pundit Readers

And everyone else, of course.

This blog "officially" launches on August 4th, but it's great having you all along for the big countdown. Here's a piece that kinda tells what this blog is about. Here's another. Here's more. Then sometimes I go all head-trippy.

Please have alook around, and come back soon. Thanks to Bill Quick and everyone who has added a link!

Posted by Phil at 06:48 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

July 30, 2003

Five Days and Counting Down

Didn't get many of those e-mails out today. And still the launch date looms. Even so, this thing is gonna be big!

Posted by Phil at 09:02 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 29, 2003

T Minus Six Days

The big day is getting closer. Tomorrow I'm sending out e-mails asking a few blogosphere acquaintences to link the Speculist on August 4. Here's hoping I get some kind of response.

Posted by Phil at 09:55 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

July 28, 2003

T Minus One Week

The Speculist is devoted to exploring the boundaries of the possible. Every week, readers will find:

  • Tools for making the most of the future.


  • Speculative essays on what might be.


  • Interviews with individuals who have something important to say about the future. In the first few weeks, I will be talking to a genetecist working on developing a cure for human aging, one of the founders of the field of nanotechnology, a former NASA guy who has a plan for getting us to Mars on the cheap, and a bright young woman who doesn't seem all that unusual until you realize she's a computer program.


  • Practical ideas on how to succeed in an era of accelerating change.

  • Ruminations on what might have been.


  • Coverage of interesting developments in nanotechnology, biotechnology, aritifical intelligence, space exploration, and other future-impacting areas.


  • Ponderings on things that never were.


  • Predictions (usually one a day, extrapolated from a referenced news story) of what may happen in the future


  • Other things I haven't thought of yet.

This pre-launch phase has given me a chance to nail down the look and feel of the thing, get my blogroll started, and try out a few things that will carry over once I get going for real.

The blog will officially launch on Monday, August 4, 2003. Don't miss it.

And, yes, I will continue with my unofficial postings in the mean time.

Posted by Phil at 07:02 AM | Comments (3) | TrackBack

July 18, 2003

Added My BLogroll

I realize this isn't exciting news, but I'm one more step closer. Plus, this time I'm doing it via .com, so it's really going to work. Thanks, Dean, for steering me in the right direction on this.

Posted by Phil at 02:46 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

June 27, 2003

New Colors

These colors come much closer to what I had in mind. The tagline needs work.

My past taglines have been "News from the heart of Metropolitan City," which obviously will not work here and "Rambling on and on about whatever I feel like, generally for no good reason" which will work, but I don't think it's the direction I want to go.

I've also thought about "Idle speculation for fun and profit...well, okay, mostly just for fun" but that might be a little too long.

Posted by Phil at 04:34 PM | Comments (0)

June 26, 2003

Launch Date

This weblog will officially launch on August 4, 2003. Between now and then, I'll be putting up some teasers and previews of coming attractions.

I just put in a bid with Bradley Ralko for advertising space at The Agitator. This should prove an interesting experiment. Is ad space a commodity that up-and-coming bloggers will buy from established bloggers in order to jumpstart their efforts?

It's possible.

Posted by Phil at 12:00 PM | Comments (1)

June 10, 2003

Dean Esmay Rules!

Hey, this seems to work. My thanks to Dean Esmay--one helluva fine human being.

Posted by Phil at 09:54 AM | Comments (0)

June 09, 2003

Alakazam!

Poof!

You're an MT user. :-)

Posted by Phil at 03:41 PM | Comments (2)